Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Dressing for an Interview; What & What NOT to Wear

We've noticed several times since say June of this year, the lack of concern for attire worn to an interview. Everything from shorts/flip flops to long blouses/tights with 4" boots. Not to mention several face piercings! Come on guys....you are interviewing for Professional positions, wear Professional attire.

Below we have posted ideas and suggestions that may assist in making those decisions. It will make a difference when you interview.

Good Luck with your job search!


Dressing for Interviews
By Michegan State University

Before you say a single word to the interviewer, you have already made an impression based on how you’re dressed. The guidelines given here are commonly accepted as appropriate for interviewing. Every company has a different dress code; how you dress at the job may have very little to do with how you dress for an interview.

Men 

·         Dress in a manner that is professionally appropriate to the position for which you are applying. In almost all cases, this means wearing a suit. It is rarely appropriate to “dress down” for an interview, regardless of company dress code policy. When in doubt, go conservative.
·         You should wear a suit to interviews. “Suit” means the works: a matching jacket and pants, dress shirt, tie, coordinating socks and dress shoes. A dark-colored suit with light colored shirt is your best option.
·         Your suit should be comfortable and fit you well so that you look and act your best. There is a difference between not yet feeling at ease in a suit and trying to fit into the same suit you wore to your sister’s wedding when you were 15. (In the latter case, it’s time to invest in a new suit!)
·         Avoid loud colors and flashy ties.
·         Clothing should be neat, clean, and pressed. If you don’t have an iron, either buy one or be prepared to visit the dry-cleaner’s often. Shower or bathe the morning of the interview. Wear deodorant. Don’t wear cologne or aftershave. You don’t want to smell overpowering or worse, cause an allergic reaction.
·         Make sure you have fresh breath. Brush your teeth before you leave for the interview, and don’t eat before the interview. Don’t smoke right before an interview.
·         Your hair should be neat, clean, and conservative.

While it may be appropriate to dress more casually for a second interview, you must still dress professionally. It’s much better to be too dressed up than too casual. A good rule of thumb is to dress like your boss. Shoes should be well-polished and in good condition, not scuffed or run-down at the heels. They should also match your belt. This may sound like a lot of rules, but these are the generally acceptable guidelines you should follow when deciding what to wear to an interview. Dressing professionally shows respect for yourself, the interviewer, and the company. You may not have to dress like this every day, but you are more likely to be taken seriously when you present yourself in a professional manner and take the time to attend to details.
Women

·         Generally, you should wear a suit with a skirt or pants.  When in doubt, be more conservative.
·         Your suit should be comfortable and fit you well; if your waistband is cutting you in half or your jacket is too tight, you won’t look or act your best. Some stores offer free alterations when you purchase a suit, or you may want to find a tailor to adjust a suit you already own.
·         Interview suits should be simple and dark in color. Anything tight, bright, short, or sheer should absolutely be avoided. (Interviewers have been known to complain about the length of interviewees’ skirts; if you have any doubts, it’s probably too short.) Knee-length skirts are suggested. Very long skirts, while modest, are also considered too trendy for an interview.
·         Wear a conservative blouse with your suit. Do not wear bright colors, animal prints, or anything lacy, sheer, or low-cut.
·         Make-up and nail polish should be understated and flattering; shades that are neutral to your skin tone are generally advisable. Avoid bright or unusual colors or very long nails.
·         Keep your jewelry and hair accessories to a minimum, and stick to those that are not flashy, distracting, or shiny. One ring per hand is best.
·         Shoes should be conservative and fairly low-heeled. They should be in reasonably good condition, not scuffed or run-down at the heels. Don’t wear shoes with an open toe or back; any shoes you would wear on a date or to a club are probably inappropriate. A basic pump is flattering, versatile, and will stay in style forever (once you own pumps, you can spend the rest of your money on fun shoes). The salesperson in the shoe store can steer you in the right direction.
·         Your hose should be neutral (matched to your skin tone). Make sure the heels are not dyed black from your shoes and that there are no snags or runs. Only use the nail polish trick in an emergency; you may want to carry an extra pair of hose with you instead.
·         Dress in a manner that is professionally appropriate to the position for which you are applying. In almost all cases, this means wearing a suit. It is rarely appropriate to “dress down” for an interview, regardless of company dress code policy. When in doubt, go conservative (is this starting to sound familiar?).
·         Your clothing should always be neat, clean, and pressed. If you don’t have an iron, either buy one or be prepared to visit the dry-cleaner’s often.
·         Shower or bathe the morning of the interview. Wear deodorant. Don’t wear perfume: you don’t want to smell overpowering or worse, cause an allergic reaction.
·         Make sure you have fresh breath. Brush your teeth before you leave for the interview, and don’t eat or smoke before the interview.
·         Your hair should be neat, clean, and conservatively styled. Banana clips, brightly-colored scrunchies or elastics, and cheerleader-type ponytails look out of place with a suit. You may want to wear your hair in an updo, pull it back into a low ponytail, or wear a barrette (this suggestion does not include the tiny little barrettes that only hold the front of your bangs back). The idea is to look polished and professional, not to advertise what a creative genius your hairdresser is.
                                                                                                                           

10 dressing faux pas to avoid when interview time comes around:
By: Carole Martin, Monster Contributing Writer


·         1.) Wild Nail Polish: This tip is for women or men. Extremely long or uncut nails are a       real turnoff, too. Your nails should be groomed and neat.
 
·         2.) Jangley Jewelry: Don't wear more than two rings per hand or one earring per ear. And no face jewelry or ankle bracelets allowed.
 
·         3.) Open-Toed or Backless Shoes: And mules are a definite no-no. Out-of-date shoes should be thrown out or kept for other occasions.
 
·         4.) Bare Legs: Wear stockings, even in humid summer weather. Stockings can be in neutral colors or a fashion color to match your shoes.
 
·         5.) Out-of-Date Suits: These have lapels that are too wide (three inches or more) or too narrow (one inch or less). A good tailor can alter lapels. The style for men's jackets is full-body and looser rather than fitted or tight. 
·         
      6.) Short Skirts: Hemlines should not be more than three inches above the knee. Don't wear capri pants or leggings to the interview.
 
·         7.) Leather Jackets for Men or Women: Even leather blazers are not good for interviewing purposes. They look like outerwear.
 
·         8.) Turtlenecks for Men: A tie is preferable, at least in the first go-round. At the very least, wear a collared shirt.
 
·         9.) Printed or Trendy Handbags: Purses should be conservative and inconspicuous.
 
·         10.) Leggings: Leggings are great for a night out or for a shopping day with the girls, but it is highly inappropriate for a job interview. It puts off the wrong message and looks very lazy, un-organized and sloppy.

Conservative colors in various shades of blue and gray are best. Wearing black to the interview could be viewed as too serious. If you do wear black, make sure another color is near your face to soften the look. Brown is still considered questionable as a business color and probably should be avoided. Change your outfit's look for a second interview by wearing a different color blouse, shirt, scarf or tie.
An interview is not the place to make a fashion statement, though those in the creative/design field and the very famous can be more adventurous. Everyone else should opt for a conservative look. "More and more companies are returning to traditional professional dress," Wildermuth says.
Whatever you wear should accent the fact that you're a professional who's ready to get to work at a new job. Let common sense guide you, and it should be easy to avoid fashion blunders that could damage your chances of getting to the next step in the process. In this market, it is essential that you look good and your appearance is right for the job.


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